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The Centurion

Entries related to: taekwondo

The Journey of Quinton Hooper

It was the mid-1990s and Quinton Hooper was neck-deep in the customs and culture of Japan. As a college student teaching English in the tiny village of Nagato, Hooper had arrived expecting to simply instruct teenagers. What the native-Texan found, however, was a chance to learn right alongside them.
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The Journey of Dana Hee

 
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Martial Arts Talk: Grand Master Fred Weeks

  One of the interesting things about my generation (millennials, or 90s kids, if you will—) is that we grew up with martial arts, even if we didn’t train. I never set foot in a martial arts gym until I was in my 20s, but I could have rattled off the names of a half-dozen or so styles, and I knew of multiple gyms/dojos around town. I never even thought about it, but now I realize that I the prevalence of martial arts in the US isn’t something to be taken for granted. I – and all young martial artists – get to enjoy the benefits of the work done by previous generations, including men like Grand Master Fred Weeks.
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Martial Arts in the Olympics

 
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12 Tips for Being the Perfect Training Partner

  I’ve trained in several martial arts (krav maga, muay thai, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, jeet kune do, kali) over a time period of eight or so years. For all their differences, they – and all martial arts – have one thing in common: partner training. There is no martial art where partner training doesn’t play a crucial role. So like it or not, you are going to have a major impact on the quality of training all your partners get.   
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Beating the White Belt Blues: A Beginner's Guide to Staying Motivated and Getting Better

  Being a white belt can be hard. You see your higher-ranked teammates trying cool moves you’ve never learned, and you face off during live rounds against those teammates and find yourself in over your head. It’s easy to get frustrated when the moves you practice daily seem harder for you than they do for your teammates. However, having the right attitude can vastly improve your experience on the mats to ensure you get the most out of every class -- and turn yourself into the person the newer students are looking up to as quickly as possible.
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6 Great Gift Ideas for Father's Day

  Many people get into martial arts because a family member started training first. In this case, it’s usually a relative someone looks up to: an older sibling, a mother, or father. I know several people for whom the latter was the case.   No one in my (immediate) family ever had an interest in martial arts, unfortunately. But I found other hobbies to share with them. My dad, for example, is an avid tennis player. He signed me up for lessons when I was a kid, taught me the finer points of the serve, and spend hours practicing with me on weekends when I played for my high school. Tennis was our thing.    Every Father’s Day, I make a point to get my dad something tennis-related. Sometimes it’s just tennis balls; other times I get fancier with tennis books, racquet clips, or tennis clothing. This theme isn’t just important because Dad likes tennis – it’s a reminder of the connection we have through the sport.     I know that for many of our readers, martial arts is the connection they have with their dad. This year, skip the ties and tools and fishing gear for Father’s Day. Give your dad a gift that’s a thank-you: for introducing you to your art, and sharing rides to the dojo. For not letting you quit when you thought you wanted to. For not letting you win in sparring, because he knew you could be so much better if you pushed yourself. For attending tournaments on the weekends, and for showing you what you could accomplish through martial arts, because he’d paved the way as a role model.  
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7 Lessons Kids Learn from Martial Arts

  In film and TV, martial arts are too often depicted as gory, violent, and inherently aggressive – something that is simply not true. Unfortunately, this perceived image leads some parents to shy away from enrolling their children in martial arts. Although martial arts do contain a physical component, they also emphasize values more than many other sports and activities.
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Things to Know Before Your First Day of Taekwondo

Part of the First Day of Martial Arts Class series.
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Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee passes away

  Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee, affectionately known as the Father of American Taekwondo, passed away today, April 30, 2018. He was 86 years old. His death leaves a void in the world of martial arts, and the world at large, that will be hard to fill. However, his legacy lives on through the thousands of students he trained and inspired.
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